Accessory and Bags [Stone Market & Shimamura]

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So it’s time for me to return to Europe tomorrow, since I unfortunately can’t keep skipping classes at university and my husband also has to return to work (he works at a ship for 35 days at the time), so I had one last shopping spree here in Japan, which was accessories and bags. The earrings and necklace is bought at a shop called “Stone market” which specializes in birth stones and all those kind of things, but they also sell cute, glittery accessory – perfect for the girly girls , like me. I wasn’t before I took the picture that I realized that I ended up buying a lot of flowers and butterflies – a “heat of the [shopping] moment”- problem, I guess. The above accessories ended up costing around 4300 yen (around 45 USD – so not the cheapest).

The last part of the shopping trip took place at the chain store, Shimamura, where I bought two bags, a shirt and lots of leg warmers, over knee socks and leggings. Everything for a very reasonable price. The two bags costs around 1000 yen each, so the two bags ended up costing around 20 USD – not a bad deal. The leg warmers and such costed around 3-4 USD pr. pair.

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I hope everyone had a nice weekend.

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Having a Bad Nail Day.

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So today one of my longest nails decided that it did not want to continue our cooperation anymore and with that broke the contact. To put it more simply: I broke it on a heavy door. A very sad day.

Since all of my other nails are very long – as seen in the photo, I decided to invest in some cheap plastic nails in the 100 yen shop (one dollar store) to cover up the damage for some time.

SONY DSC80 pieces of plastic nails for 100 yen (around 1 USD) is not such a bad deal, though I must admit that I don’t have much experience with fake nails, since I love doing nail art and I have my nails decorated and polished all the time with helps them getting stronger and therefore longer. The two other items in the picture is nail glue and glue remover – also 100 yen (1 USD).

 

 

Clothes & Shoe Haul [Honey’s & Shimamura]

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When I did my exchange in Japan last year, I lived close to a shopping mall, which had a clothing store named “Honey’s” – it was love at first sight. A lot of fashion stores in Japan only have M sizes – which is kind of seen as “one-size”, which sometimes makes it hard for me to buy clothes in Japan. I’m by no means neither over-weight nor am I considered big (I’ve sometimes even been called skinny) – but I do have curves (read: big boobs) which is something that doesn’t go well along with Japanese fashion.

The chain store “Honey’s” can save us foreigners in Japan, who loves Japanese cute fashion, but have a bit too big curves for the small sizes. Honey’s carries S, M and L sizes and the L size is the perfect one for me (Not so good news for plus size girls – sorry). Not only does Honey’s sell cute Japanese fashion in several sizes, they’re also very affordable compared to other Japanese clothing stores. Their price range is within 1000 – 3000 yen. (10 – 30 USD), where’s most fashion stores in Japan has a price range from 5000 – 20,000 yen (50 – 200 USD).

So of course during this time in Japan I of course needed a trip to Honey’s before going back to Europe, which resulted in my buying four skirts and four shirts. Totaling in around 16,500 yen (around 175 USD).

I was not able to find all the clothing items I bought on the online shop, but here’s some of the shirts and skirts I bought. If you’re interested in seeing how youth fashion looks in Japan, you can check out their online shop: Honey’s.

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Another chain clothing store in Japan which offers cheap clothes, accessories and shoes are the “Shimamura” chain, which also offers “big sizes” as one of the few shops in Japan. They have around the same price range as Honey’s (though a bit cheaper actually) and their fashion is a bit similar. In Shimamura I bought two shirts and a pair of shorts, I also bought these shoes.

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They cost around 2000 yen pr. pair (around 20 USD), so they’re also in the rather cheap price range here in Japan and for a shoe loving girl as me it was like paradise – or actually more like hell, since I had to chose which ones I wanted to the most, because it’s actually not my own money I spend here, but my husband’s. XD

Recipe: Making Goma Dango (Sesame Dumplings) [ごま団子]

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So like a big amount of girls I love sweets and it’s a miracle that I’m not bigger than I am – since I seem to spend a good part of time eating anything from cakes, cookies and sweet bread – especially when I’m in Japan. One of my favorites here in Japan is pretty much anything with “anko” (red bean paste) and the price winner among anko desserts are “goma dangos” (sesame dumplings). In Japanese these dumplings are considered “chuka” – food which originates from China, but like with most so-called Chinese food in Japan, I feel sure that the taste is different from whatever they might have been inspired from. Anyways, I made these dumplings twice lately and since they’re very easy to make (if you’re able to get hold of the ingredients) I thought I would share this simple recipe.

These are the needed ingredients:

[For 16 dumplings]

  • 200g Dango/dumpling mix.

  • 150 ml. water

  • 200g Koshian (anko) (Red bean paste)

  • White sesame

  • Frying oil.

First pour the dingo/dumpling mix in a bowl and there after add water (some also add milk) – it’s best to pour it in little at the time to make sure you don’t put too much in. Some dango mix needs more water than other, but when the powder has a firm texture it’s done. Then blend the powder and water together with your hands till it has the wanted texture. You can also add some sugar in the mixture after your own liking.

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Then you divide the dango mass into 16 balls. (Yes, there’s more than 16 balls in the picture, but it was for a bigger portion.)

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Then your pour out 200g of red bean paste and like with the dumplings you divide the red bean paste into 16 balls.

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Then you flat out your small dumpling balls in your hand and place the red bean paste in the middle and then your wrap the dumpling around the bean paste and finally you roll them around in your hand till they reach the wanted round ball shape.

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Then you cover the dumplings with the white sesame and then you fry them in oil till they have the good golden color and the outside of the dumpling has hardened a bit and then you’re done!. Enjoy your sesame dumplings.

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Japanese styled ear & hair accessory

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Yesterday I went to the Japanese Daiso store here in Miyazaki. Daiso store is a 100 yen shop – similar to a 1 Dollar store. Pretty much everything in the whole store costs 10o yen (105 yen tax included), which is around 1 dollar. You can often find all sorts of fun things in a 100 yen shop and no matter how many times I’ve been to the Japanese 100 yen shops, I keep getting surprised about what you can actually get for 100 yen – everything from tableware, snacks, drinks, clothing items, stationary, garden things, souvenirs, storage solutions and accessories.

And yesterday it was especially the accessory area that caught my attention, since they had these interesting Japanese themed (Japanese-patterned) earrings and hair accessory. They have basically used pattern often seen on Japanese kimonos and made several shapes.

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The earrings are either made of glass-like plastic or fabric. The shapes of the plastic earrings spanned from flowers, leafs, tear drops, squares and etc. The fabric earrings were in the shapes of flowers, ribbons or butterflies. There were a lot more shapes and patterns in the shop than pictured above.

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Like the earrings the hair accessories also had several shapes to offer, though from the same brand as the earrings you could chose from flowers, butterflies and ribbons – all made of fabric. On another shelfs bigger accessories were available – like big flowers and the traditional square shaped hairband as pictured above.

All these 12 accessory items totalled in 1260 yen (tax included) which is around 13USD – which is quite affordable shopping for cute and unique, Japanese styled accessories.

Earrings and Make-up Shopping [LA Colors]

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Yesterday I went shopping in the Aeon Shopping mall in Miyazaki, Japan with my husband (somebody had to pay for the fun). And Like always I find myself spending too much time looking at make-up and jewelry. I bought a lot of earrings, stockings, leg-warmers, make-up and other stuff. I just though it would be interesting to show these “Alice in Wonderland” themed earrings I bought. Japan really knows how to create cute designs that makes you want to spend your husband’s money. All the earrings I bought (including the above) are made in Japan, which makes them a bit more expensive that the regular girlish jewelry you can find in Japan. The earrings cost between 900 yen to 1,400 yen (10 – 16 USD), where you can often buy cute jewelry for the price of 315 yen to 600 yen. (3.5 – 9 USD).

Of course if you want real silver or gold jewelry you have to dish up with a lot of more money, since Japan has never been known for being a cheap country. I almost feel like crying every time I have to pay 3,5 USD for one apple or 60 cent for one single carrot. Eating healthy in Japan might kill me.

Another purchase of mine was three make-up pallets from LA colors – each with 16 shimmer colors.

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The first one is with pinkish and purple colors, the second is with blueish and green colors and the last one has silver, copper and gold colors. This is the first time I’ve come across this brand, but when I saw the colors and the price it was love at first sight, which resulted in me buying all of them. One pallet costs 840 yen (around 9 USD), which is rarely a price I’ve come across – at least not when it comes to quality products, so I had my worries, but let the colors sweep me away. I was to be honest positively surprised by these products, the colors are a lot more pigmented than I had hoped for and the blend very nicely. I have one of the big Sephora pallets, which costs are lot more than these LA colors combined, but I have to admit that I actually can’t see the big difference between the two products. The Sephora one actually seems to have a lot more fall-outs than the LA colors, if I have to compare something else.

Of course these LA colors products are not the best make-up products I own or have tested, but considering the very cheap price I actually think they’re well worth the money, especially for everyday casual use. The colors are beautiful, shimmery, varied and transfers well from the pallet to the eyelid. I’m very happy with this purchase and I could see myself buying more LA colors products in the future.

I have been inactive for some time due to a busy schedule and a week ago a family member passed away here in Japan and I’ve been very busy with funeral preparations. I think my next blog entry will describe a shinto funeral here in Japan. Since I myself didn’t know much about this.